fresh lady creamer peas

 

creamer peas-finished

at the risk of sounding unpopular, sometimes due to the extreme heat, crushing crowds, and added expense of it all, i just have to take time off from the farmer’s market. don’t get me wrong, i love to support local growers, organic or otherwise (you’d be hard-pressed to find any farmer’s at the market who use chemicals or sprays, anyhow), but i am not a competitive person by nature, so sometimes all the nudging to get at the best tomatoes, peaches, and eggs can get a bit much for me. but after a break from it a few weeks back, i come with new eyes and spot some fresh lady creamer peas. this is exactly the type of thing that makes each farmer’s market unique: the distinct nature of the local produce. this, of course, begged the question: what to do with them? after poking around online and coming up with with virtually nothing about this very specific item, i had my suspicions about where to turn for assistance, robb walsh‘s ‘the texas cowboy cookbook’. robb has become an expert in regional cooking, including cowboy and tex-mex cooking styles, real texas barbeque, texas gulf specialties (like oysters, etc), you name it. if you love anything texas, these books are for you.

creamer peas -book

these  peas, which are interchangeable with any fresh field peas such as black eyed or purple hull peas in their cooking style, are a cinch to make and compliment a great texas summer meal. we had ours with grilled pork loin and summer squash, and cornbread.

creamer peas

fresh lady creamer peas (serves 4-6 as a side dish)

1 pound shelled lady creamer, black -eyed, purple hull peas (about 3 cups)

2-3 slices bacon, chopped

1 medium onion, diced

2 cups stock (preferably homemade chicken or veggie)

salt & pepper

hot pepper sauce of your choice (i prefer cholula, the best hot sauce on earth, that’s just me)

rinse and drain peas. in a large skillet over low-medium heat add bacon to pan. remember you are rendering the fat from the bacon. it’s important to cook it on the slow side, otherwise you end up with most of the fat still clinging to the meat of the bacon instead on as liquid in the pan. when bacon is crisp, remove meaty pieces and set aside to drain on paper toweling. alternatively, you can leave them in the pan, but since i prefer my bacon a bit crisp, not limp, i take it out and add it back in at the end of cooking. add diced onion and cook until softened and translucent. add stock and peas. bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer peas until desired tenderness, about 15-20 minutes, checking liquid level and adding more stock (or water) as necessary. i like them a little firm, but this is not the usual texan way. add bacon back in (if removed) and season with salt & pepper. serve with a little pot likker (some of the cooking liquid, i know it’s not greens but, hey…it’s good), hot sauce, and corn bread to sop it all up.

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7 Comments

Filed under bacon, beans, side dish

7 responses to “fresh lady creamer peas

  1. At the downtown market last Saturday, a farmer tried his hardest to sell me some fresh peas. I wasn’t prepared to use them, but I thought I’d have to get some next week. These sound great with hot sauce and cornbread!

  2. I could eat legumes everyday of the week. They are legumes…no? legumes/peas either way…Looks great!

    Megan

    PS I didn’t have any darn candy ginger for the jam…but that does sound good..next time! I gave it a twist by adding cinnamon sticks while cooking…Thanks C.C.

  3. Lauren

    Looks fabulous. Had a dish just like this at a fancy schmancy spot in my neighborhood and it was the best part of my meal…And the cheapest! I’ll be on the lookout for these at my market.

  4. That’s the first time I’ve seen such creamy-looking peas! Gorgeous!

  5. Texas Lizzie

    Creamer peas are a little different from other peas; they need the least prep to taste really good – less cooking, less seasonings, etc., as per my East Texas sources… who steer me away from black-eyed peas (love Texas caviar!) to creamers…. and they keep for a long time as long as refrigerated.

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